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Correction spending rises while incarcerated population declines in Massachusetts

January 04, 2022. Chris Lisinski, State House News Service In this story from WBUR, it is clear that accountability is needed to ensure that state funding for places of incarceration is used to provide expanded programming that individuals in correctional facilities can access. This is good for incarcerated individuals’ mental health and for the community… Continue reading Correction spending rises while incarcerated population declines in Massachusetts

Alternative to Solitary Confinement Offers Promising Results for Inmates  

By Kelli South is the research associate at the Treatment Advocacy Center. Incarcerated individuals with serious mental illness are much more likely to be placed in solitary confinement compared to incarcerated individuals without serious mental illness. There is a wealth of research that shows the deleterious effects that solitary confinement can have on an individual, including increasing rates of depression, anxiety and… Continue reading Alternative to Solitary Confinement Offers Promising Results for Inmates  

Charging for prison phone calls burdens families

While the SJC ponders the “legalized kickbacks” of telecom contracts, lawmakers can fix this now. By Boston Globe – The Editorial Board – Updated November 3, 2021 It’s a relatively simple proposition: Good corrections policy that helps those behind bars maintain family ties can lead to better outcomes — like lower recidivism rates and more successful reentry… Continue reading Charging for prison phone calls burdens families

Pen Pals for Incarcerated Individuals Needed!

FFIMI would like to share an opportunity to make a difference in the life of an incarcerated individual. MASC (Massachusetts Against Solitary Confinement) is coordinating this pen pal program and this week they received 15 new requests for pen pals from people who are incarcerated!  They now have 31 people who are waiting to be pen pals with… Continue reading Pen Pals for Incarcerated Individuals Needed!

I Am Not Your ‘Inmate’

by Lawrence Bartley I didn’t always detest this term. But hearing officers use it as an insult reminded me to call incarcerated people — including myself — by our names. “Stop talking to me like I’m some fu***n’ inmate!” I overheard my prison employer screaming into the phone receiver. He was replaying an encounter with… Continue reading I Am Not Your ‘Inmate’

A Model of Care

By Donna Winant, FFIMI Director The mission of Family and Friends of Individuals with Mental Illness (FFIMI) is to advocate for persons suffering from Serious Mental Illness (SMI) and involved in the criminal justice system: to assure they are provided a continuum of proper psychiatric care, treatment, and services across the entire spectrum of the… Continue reading A Model of Care

From Treatment Advocacy Center: Co-Responding Police and Mental Health Team Reduces Likelihood of Arrest

By Kelli South of Treatment Advocacy Center Co-response teams involving both police officers and mental health providers are becoming more widely used for response to crisis calls involving people with mental illnesses. As these programs grow in popularity across the United States, there is not yet a large amount of research available proving the efficacy of such crisis… Continue reading From Treatment Advocacy Center: Co-Responding Police and Mental Health Team Reduces Likelihood of Arrest

Courts of Dignity

By Meaghan Winter This article from the May/June 2021 issue of Psychotherapy Networker highlights the deplorable way the the criminal justice system treats those who suffer with mental illness, often causing worsening conditions and pushing them down a painful and dangerous path. Mental Health Courts, also known as problem-solving courts, offer a chance of a trauma… Continue reading Courts of Dignity

Important Upcoming Legislation – Why FFIMI Supports It and What Sets it Apart

Massachusetts State Senator Cindy F. Friedman has introduced Bill No. S.1034, which can be viewed at https://malegislature.gov/Bills/192/S1034. Although as many as 20 States have enacted what are known as Guilty But Mentally Ill (GBMI) statutes, the newly proposed Massachusetts bill differs significantly from those other GBMI statutes in a few critical ways. Those differences lead… Continue reading Important Upcoming Legislation – Why FFIMI Supports It and What Sets it Apart

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